A lesson in customer experience, also for energy suppliers: "I'm not interested in that,...

14.03.2019

How appropriate: On the way to a customer appointment at the EVU on the subject of "Customer Experience".

How appropriate: On the way to a customer appointment at the EVU on the subject of "Customer Experience". With Deutsche Bahn in a train of the Swiss SBB. Catenary damage still in Germany, delay of 30 minutes, an older lady asks for your connection in Switzerland. Answer of the train attendant: "I am not interested in that". At least he then explains that this information is not made available to him, only his Swiss colleagues have it. Now I don't know if the conductor is not aware that this info can be found in the railway's own app. Or if there is an instruction not to use it. It is possible that the conductor had a bad day - which I personally do not believe, because during this three-hour trip I had more "moments of truth" of this kind in which the conductor played a role. Although uninvolved, this one negative experience has already annoyed me so much that I would prefer not to ride the train anymore. And this does not make me an isolated case: according to studies, about one in three customers turns away from a provider they actually like after their first bad experience. In the case of the railway as a company with more or less no alternatives, however, the consequences that one can draw as a customer are limited. You don't like standing in traffic jams either. In energy supply, where there are sometimes around 100 alternatives available in a postcode, the situation is of course different. If one now wants to show understanding for the situation and suppress the fact that satisfactory reactions to such questions as those of the older lady certainly look different, then one can take away that employees in such a situation are actually dependent on receiving all information and (technical) possibilities from their employer in order to be able to react correctly to customer questions. More - in connection with a few friendly, understanding words - would probably not have been necessary here. However, in other situations, including in the case of rail transport companies, it may also be useful to provide employees with a defined freedom of decision, to offer compensation directly, a promotional gift or another product that better meets the needs of the customer. This is also the case if this is at the expense of the margin in the short term. Because in the end - as studies also show - positive customer experiences lead to satisfaction with the company, its performance and services, recommendations, less churn, more sales, higher profitability - and more growth. In this respect, CX pioneers are expected to achieve annual growth rates twice as high as their competitors. You can also read that their organizational structure is 15% leaner. The task of "Customer Experience Management" is to get all this done. A first step in this direction can be the development of a customer experience strategy. Interviews with stakeholders are useful for recording the "CX Maturity Level" and defining the experiences that an RU should stand for. A strong CX vision can then be developed in a CX-Nordstern workshop. In order to develop involving, sustainable visions, we recommend methods such as "Lego Serious Play", which allow the integration of different levels of inspiration. On this basis, a CX strategy including the corresponding CX architecture and roadmap can be developed. It makes sense that this strategy is then agreed with the management with the aim that the management is convinced of the necessity of the CX strategy and is prepared to take the lead. Without this commitment, CXM cannot be successfully introduced. Everything else like generating customer insights or implementing a CX-Management platform will follow in the course of further implementation. Have we aroused your interest in optimizing your own economic situation through consistent CX management? Please contact us - we will be happy to support you.

Kontakt:
Heike Hahn
+49 201 1022-265
hahn@conenergy.com